Wing Chun Dummies

September 7th, 2006

A good quality Wing Chun Wooden Dummy(Mook Joong) with Stand can be hard to find.

A time-tested traditional training tool, the Wooden Dummy (Mook Joong or Mook Jong) is used by Wing Chun practitioners or anyone who wants to harden their practical fighting skills.

Wing Chun Dummies

December 19th, 2005

A good quality Wing Chun Wooden Dummy(Mook Joong) with Stand can be hard to find.

A time-tested traditional training tool, the Wooden Dummy (Mook Joong or Mook Jong) is used by Wing Chun practitioners or anyone who wants to harden their practical fighting skills.

Filipino Martial Magazine

June 21st, 2005

Visit http://www.filipinomag.com/ foir information on the vast array of Filipino Martial Traditions, including Arnis, Escrima, Serrada / Largo Mano, DeCuerdas / Doce Pares

Excellent article on Chi Gung

June 21st, 2005

http://www.westga.edu/~kungfu/chigung.html

Excerpt: Chi Gung (chee-gung) is usually defined as “cultivation of the chi.” Chi Gung is an internal system generally considered to be the genesis of Chinese martial arts, the seed from which all of our present systems grew. These exercises developed from…

The Paradox of One And Many in Aikido Philosophy

June 8th, 2005

The Paradox of One And Many in Aikido Philosophy by Charlie Badenhop

Read about how we can better appreciate, empathize with, and respect the diverse people, energies, and opinions that we come in contact with on a daily basis.

My Aikido teacher Koichi Tohei sensei used to say that in a healthy person the flow of their “ki” (the energy inherent throughout the Universe) is like the outpouring of an underground spring sitting at the bottom of a deep lake. The spring feeds water to the lake, much like we can feed the universe healing energy. The spring feeds the lake a constant flow of water without ever being diminished, and this outpouring of water is not impeded by the weight and pressure of the lake bearing down upon it. When ki flows it follows the path of least resistance. This is a path of great power. As human beings we are designed to feed energy to the universe, by following a path of least resistance. This feeding of “our” energy is what helps us to also maintain our own personal health and well being. We receive by giving, because our ki belongs to the Universe, and not to any one individual.

In this article I want to talk about how we can better appreciate, empathize with, and respect the diverse people, energies, and opinions that we come in contact with on a daily basis. I hope to give some small insight into how we can begin to understand the paradox of One common energy source feeding all of the diversity and difference that we see around us. In Aikido we practice what I guess could be called a “physical” discipline to accomplish this. We PRACTICE appreciation, empathy, and respect, in regard to our partner, with the hope that some day in the future our practice will transform into an embodied reality. We practice breathing exercises and meditation, and in the course of these experiences we have a sense of being one with the universe.

In Aikido, as new students we first learn how to balance our physical structure and relax the body’s musculature. It is this balance and release of excess muscular tension that allows the weight of the body’s trunk to come to a natural resting place in our lower abdomen, in the general area of our reproductive organs. This area in our lower abdomen is what Tohei sensei calls “the one point” and he exhorts his students to maintain the feeling of the body’s weight resting naturally in this area. By maintaining physical balance and relaxation we release excess physical tension, calm the thinking mind, and sense a common bond with all of life. At such times we naturally generate a copious flow of ki, and exude a healing presence to those around us. Previously I said that ki is the life force that animates all living beings and that all living beings share and utilize the SAME energy source, the same ki, the same spirit. In Aikido we call this shared universal spirit “reiseishin.” When we balance and relax the body, unify our thoughts and actions, and calm our thinking mind, we manifest an outpouring of “Reseishin” in the same manner that a mother holding her newborn baby exudes and expresses love, protection, and compassion. When we experience the flow of “reiseishin” we naturally appreciate, empathize with, and respect all of life.

For me personally, what is important to say in regard to sensing the flow of “reiseishin” is that the experience is not generated by the activity of the thinking mind. Our sense of unity with all of life comes about when we “do only what is necessary, and nothing more or less.” It is this “doing less” that leads to greater power and a greater sense of connection to life. We gain the paradoxical experience of calmness and action being two sides of the same coin. One being the mirror image of the other. Great calmness leads to great action, like a hurricane radiating out from its calm “eye.” Great action leads to great calmness, as when a strongly thrown top rights itself and calmly spins round its center.

When you balance and relax your body, unify your thoughts and actions, and calm your thinking mind, you move from an experience of duality to an experience of commonality. At such times you understand experientially what is paradoxical to the thinking mind – That so much difference comes from One source.

You breathe deeply and sense the simultaneous inflow and outflow of ki.
You breathe deeply and feel a “heavy-lightness” in the body.
You breathe deeply and sense the “immovable-movement” of your spirit.

When you sense and move with the energy that is manifesting throughout the universe you find that you have a greater ability to live a life that is healthy and fulfilling, a greater sense of valuing and protecting all of life. When you learn to instinctively move with others rather than attempting to oppose them, you quickly come to a sense of intuitively understanding your counterpart’s thoughts and actions, and you increase the likelihood of your being able to gently lead your counterpart in new directions in the future. This is certainly a timely topic given the current conditions in the world today. Aikido is a martial art that wages peace. We have no attack form in Aikido, even though Aikido is very much an effective form of self-defense. As I said previously, in Aikido we cultivate an experience that leads us to believe that all living beings utilize and share a common energy source (ki) that helps to run and maintain our environment as well as our individual human systems. We believe that since we all share a common energy source, that in some important way we are all truly members of the same family, and that we share our lives with all of nature. We do not have an attack form in Aikido, because attacking another human being would be like attacking a family member that you love. One of the main ideas of Aikido is to find a way to honor and protect your own being, your own opinions, your own right to life, while CONCURRENTLY honoring and protecting the same in your opponent. Not at all a simple task, but one well worth trying to embody.

As you learn to locate and maintain your own personal “center”, you discover that your center is both local and global, or as Akio Morita the past CEO of Sony said, “We must think globally while acting locally. We must develop the capacity to be ‘glocal’.” When you experience this sense of being “glocal” you manifest a greater capacity to join and blend with the “ki” of others. You realize that in some very important way we all share the same ki, the same ancestry, the same God, the same life. There is a “oneness” to all of life, and this “One” can never be reduced to zero. From this “One” energy two counterbalancing forces appeared and stimulated and supported each other, and the conditional world was born. The conditional world requires the ongoing working relationship of “opposites.” Night and Day, Male-Female, Yin and Yang. These opposites REQUIRE and support each other. If night were to oppose day, if male denigrates and or suppresses female, if one group of people subjugates another, all of life is diminished in some important sense. The relative world REQUIRES difference in order to maintain the commonality of life. Differences in opinion, difference in beliefs, differences in religion, all lead to a feeding of the “reiseishin” of our common spirit. It is so important for us to realize that “difference” creates the diversity that supports the viability of future life, that opposites are necessary for counterbalance in a conditional world. We must sense our oneness with all of life, while not in any way requiring that there only be one right way, one set of beliefs, one religion.

Three important components in supporting the diversity that feeds life, are Appreciation, Empathy, and Respect.

1. Appreciation of diversity fosters an openness to exploring difference. An openness to exploring difference means that we will have a much richer wealth of ideas and alternatives to draw upon. This is one of the necessary components for successful adaptation. We move away from a concept of “right or wrong” and instead consider what will work best in this particular instance. We welcome and acknowledge the process of trial and error, knowing that all learning requires that we make some mistakes along the way. If we belittle or stifle the answers or opinions that don’t wind up fitting our needs this time around, we denigrate the creative process, and diminish the flow of new ideas in the future.
2. Empathy helps us to be responsive to the needs, dreams, and desires of others. When we are sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of others, we soon realize that “MY” way is not the only way. “My” way is not THE right way. “My” way is only one of many ways.
3. Respect is an important component in fostering all of life, because it leads to the manifestation of “reiseishin.” Our task in life is not easy. But luckily, we each have great capacity, as we are each fed by the “One” ki of the universe.

May the importance of differences in opinion and beliefs be appreciated. May we empathize with the plight of others. May we bow to and respect the sanctity of all life.

About the Author

Charlie Badenhop is the originator of Seishindo, an Aikido instructor, NLP trainer, and Ericksonian Hypnotherapist. Benefit from his thought-provoking ideas and a new self-help Practice every two weeks, by subscribing to his complimentary newsletter “Pure Heart, Simple Mind” at http://www.seishindo.org/anger/index.html .

Mushin – Peak Performance States in Aikido Philosophy

June 8th, 2005

Mushin – Peak Performance States in Aikido Philosophy by Charlie Badenhop

In Aikido we learn how to enter into a peak performance state that in the Japanese arts is known as “mushin.” In Seishindo work we often call “mushin” a state of “embodied presence.” “Mushin” is similar to the term “flow state” as used by many people to describe the conditions for peak performance. For several years now I have been defining “embodied presence/mushin” in the following manner: “When the structure of your body is balanced, and your thinking mind is fully present but not engaged in any form of internal dialogue, you will tend to release any extraneous thoughts or actions and enter into the flow state of “mushin.” Your thoughts, feelings, and actions occur simultaneously and spontaneously. Nothing comes between your thoughts and your actions, and nothing is left over. When we embody such a state we greatly improve our ability to learn with grace and ease.”

At such times we have a pleasing sense of fullness and great potential. We do not attempt to eliminate or control our thoughts, feelings, or actions, but rather we move with our thoughts, and feel into our experience. Breath, movement, action, and rest. Breath, movement, action, and rest. So when I say above that I want to talk about peak performance states and how we can live our lives with a greater sense of ease, grace, and power, I am referring to how to enter into a special learning state where our thoughts, actions, and feelings occur simultaneously and spontaneously.

This state of “mushin” is one that we very much strive to experience in Aikido (and in other Japanese arts as well) knowing full well that it is not a state that we will maintain throughout the course of our everyday life. Indeed, what we do when we find we are NOT in a state of embodied presence and instead mired in a difficult situation, tells us much about our spirit and our deeply held beliefs. Mushin is an ephemeral state that is to be experienced and released. An experience that is meant to be lost and found a gain, many times over in the course of our life. Please be certain that I consider peak performance states to be an enjoyable quest and not just for some special few who are professional performers of one sort or another.

When we enter into mushin for even brief periods of time we find that we receive what I call “a residue experience.” By this I mean that even when we enter back into our everyday mind, we find ourself living our life with a greater sense of vitality and well being. Our relationships with others tend to be more heartfelt, compassionate, and aware. We find ourselves feeling more connected to our “self” and our everyday experience, while living our life with a greater sense of meaning.

If you are at all like most of the human beings I meet every day, and the one that I meet in the mirror every morning, during much of your life your thoughts, actions, and feelings occur somewhat independently of each other, and you lack a certain sense of spontaneity. To some extent this is part of the human condition, and yet we can definitely also achieve from time to time, a much fuller way of learning and living.

One of the unique aspects of embodied presence is that we do not have internal dialogue when we are fully present in the moment. By “fully present in the moment” I mean remaining relaxed while fully engaging in an activity, without internal dialogue taking up any of our attention or awareness.

Mushin = Embodied presence
Embodied presence = Fully present in the moment
Fully present in the moment = Michael Jordan during an NBA final; Tiger Woods at the Masters; My daughter watching her Saturday morning kids program.

I think that being able to be free from internal dialogue at times is quite an interesting phenomenon. One of the main questions I always ponder in this regard is “Who is talking to who?” during internal dialogue. Another thought that I often have is “Why in the world do I need to tell myself what I am feeling? Why not just feel?” And of course asking myself such questions is just another form of internal dialogue!

To me, the fact that we have internal dialogue in the first place leads me to understand that each person has at least two different selves that they experience life through. One self is a rational/cognitive self with its “headquarters” being just that, in the head. This is the self that generates our internal dialogue and likes to critique what we are doing. Our other self is an emotional/somatic self with its command center being in the body. This appears to be the self that the cognitive self is trying to inform via words. The problem is that the somatic self thinks in feelings and not in words, so really the only thing it understands from the verbal communication of the cognitive self is the tone of voice, volume, and phrasing. Seem hard to believe?

If you have a dog bring it to a foreign country some time and you will notice that it does quite well in understanding the basic conversation directed towards it by the local populace. In Japanese they would say “Kawaii! Kawaii!”, and your dog would soon be wagging its tail. Either your dog is a heck of a lot better at learning foreign languages than you are (which is quite possible if you are like many of my fellow Americans), or, your dog is picking up the basic meaning of what is being said, via the tone of voice, volume, and phrasing. Your rational self thinks with the aid of verbal language. Your somatic self “thinks” like all other mammals, and such thinking involves making meaning out of what is sensed, rather than distilling meaning from the spoken word. When entering into a state of mushin we want the feeling, intuitive, mammalian mind to come to the forefront, while the rational mind is encouraged to take a bit of a holiday.

When things are going well for us our two selves seem to cooperate rather nicely and at such times it is likely that we will not have internal dialogue. We easily reach this cooperative mushin state when walking in a beautiful mountain range area, playing with a young child, or perhaps when watching a compelling movie. In my way of thinking, the three examples offered here are everyday examples of a peak performance state. The whole self is actively aware of, in touch with, and absorbed by, what is transpiring. There is no need to comment on what is occurring, because every part of you already “knows” what is going on. Your thoughts, feelings, and actions occur simultaneously and spontaneously. If you take a moment to think about it, most any state that we find highly pleasurable could be defined as a peak performance state. Interesting to think about how peak performance relates to pleasure.

On the other hand, when we get worried, frightened, or angry, we usually find our two selves (rational and somatic) in conflict with each other. In fact what becomes most obvious during times of stress, is the very different methods that your rational and somatic selves have of processing and understanding what is occurring. When your rational self gets upset it uses words to express what it is feeling. “What’s the matter stupid? I thought you knew better!” might be a common complaint uttered by your rational self. Your somatic self on the other hand communicates that it is upset by releasing various enzymes that lead to an upset stomach, or by tensing up the muscles of the body until you find yourself with a headache. What is important to note here is that both selves can be quite adept at communicating that something is wrong, but often the cognitive self delivers this message in the form of self criticism rather than really helping you to note in a compassionate manner just what needs to be different. Your rational self is sort of like a scientist or news commentator. It comments on what is being felt, much more than actually feeling into the experience.

One of the main tasks of entering into and maintaining a mushin peak performance state is keeping your rational self and your somatic self cooperating with each other and supporting each other. In most instances what we invariably find, is that instructions delivered by the rational mind via internal dialogue, almost always get in the way.

What to do then?

The Seishindo Practice “Peak Performance Coach #1″ can help you to begin to understand the early stages of peak performance states. Rather than “trying” to achieve a certain way of being, and wondering why it isn’t quite happening yet, this exercise is designed to help you start from where you are, and begin the journey from there.

About the Author

Charlie Badenhop is the originator of Seishindo, an Aikido instructor, NLP trainer, and Ericksonian Hypnotherapist. Benefit from his thought-provoking ideas and a new self-help Practice every two weeks, by subscribing to his complimentary newsletter “Pure Heart, Simple Mind” at http://www.seishindo.org/anger/index.html .

Trust in the moment, and trust in yourself

June 8th, 2005

Trust in the moment, and trust in yourself by Charlie Badenhop

Do you often get yourself upset and feeling less than fully confident, as part of your preparation for facing a daunting challenge? You can improve your performance if you let your somatic intelligence lead the way.”You move too much to be effective.” Tamura sensei softly shouted at me. “You need to give your opponent a clearer target to strike at.”

We were in the middle of studying how to defend ourselves from multiple attackers in an Aikido class for senior students in Japan.

Five young college students rushed at me once again, and once again I struggled to cope with them.

“OK, take a break.” Tamura sensei said. “In order for the five attackers to actually hit you they have to first reach you. Your job is NOT to run away from them. You need to create a spacing that leads them to all try and grab or hit you at the same time. Think of the attackers as needing to pass through a gate. If they all try and rush through the gate at the same time they will block each others efforts. Move less, do less, and be calm. Give them a clear target that they all reach at the same time.”

I had heard similar remarks in the past, but accomplishing this in the heat of the moment requires a moving calmness that takes a while to get the hang of. You know in your head what you are supposed to do, but once your heart starts beating faster and your opponents are bearing down on you, you find it really hard to believe in what you are being told.

“Think of it this way.” sensei said. He pulled out a cloth that he used to wipe away his sweat and said, “Here, take this away from me.”

As I grabbed for the cloth, he more or less handed it to me. Just as I was beginning to get a good hold on it he let go of the cloth and grabbed onto my wrist and placed me in a painful hold. I immediately let go of the cloth, and he picked it back up with one hand as he continued to keep me subdued with his other hand.

“You see.” he said, “I am not defending the cloth, I am defending myself. Better to give you the cloth, and then I have both hands free to do as I need.”

“When you move less you offer your opponents a clear target. When you offer them a clear target you will be able to understand how they are wanting to attack. They will attack you in the same manner you reached for my cloth. Confident they will accomplish their mission, because you have made it easy for them. At the last moment, just as they begin to strike or grab, take the target away from them. They will be surprised, and you will have the opportunity to do whatever is necessary.”

He got up and invited the five students to attack him. He moved very little, and it was as if he was making each one of them thread themselves through the eye of a needle. Just ever so much of a movement made by him, made them just miss their target.

“This is what happens often in our every day life.” he said. “You feel like you are faced with a daunting task, and you make your task harder by moving about needlessly and losing your composure. Breathe deeply, be calm, and know the right moment will present itself to you if you have the faith to wait. Don’t force the issue, and don’t force the timing. Trust in the moment, and trust in yourself. Take the initiative by doing nothing.”

You ARE capable. Give yourself the opportunity to excel by trusting in the moment and trusting in yourself. Wait calmly, and you will find that the necessary answers appear before you. Little by little… with lots of practice… and endless patience. Only move when the moment is right. Breathe deeply and begin at the beginning.

About the Author

Charlie Badenhop is the originator of Seishindo, an Aikido instructor, NLP trainer, and Ericksonian Hypnotherapist. Benefit from his thought-provoking ideas and a new self-help Practice every two weeks, by subscribing to his complimentary newsletter “Pure Heart, Simple Mind” at http://www.seishindo.org/anger/index.html .

The Ki of Aikido – An Oriental Concept of “Energy”, “Self” and “Mind”

June 8th, 2005

The Ki of Aikido – An Oriental Concept of “Energy”, “Self” and “Mind” by Charlie Badenhop

Preface

There are many different ways to perceive, utilize, and benefit from energy. What I offer here is one of many ways. Indeed when I do other kinds of activities I perceive of and work with energy in quite a different manner. What follows is my experience of energy while performing Aikido over the course of more than twenty years. Certainly there are likely to be many other Aikido practitioners that would explain their experiences and beliefs in a manner that is somewhat different than mine. I offer you here, one experience, my experience, and thus all that I say is part of my belief system, and not at all necessarily THE truth.

Aikido

Aikido is a Japanese martial art, and it does not have an attack form. We do not kick, punch, or in any other manner, attempt to hurt our opponent.

The meaning of Aikido:
“Ai” To gather or harmonize.
“Ki” Universal life force/energy. This is the energy that we share with nature and all living beings.
“Do” An artful path of discovery.
“Aikido” An artful path of discovering how to gather and harmonize the energy of the universe.
When we sense and move with the energy that is manifesting throughout the universe we find that we have a greater ability to live a life that is healthy and fulfilling.

“Ki”

In Aikido we believe that all human beings utilize and share a common energy source (ki) that helps to run and maintain our environment as well as our individual human systems. We believe that since we all share a common energy source, that in some important way we are all truly members of the same family, and truly sharing our lives with all of nature. We do not have an attack form in Aikido, because attacking an opponent would be like attacking a family member that you love. Attacking an opponent would also be like attempting to damage the flow of Universal energy in the world, and such acts are likely to have many far reaching consequences.

In the Japanese language words that use the concept of “ki” are common.
“Gen-ki” means “root energy” or one’s “personal health”.
“Ten-ki” relates to “heavenly energy” or “the weather”.
“Hon-ki” relates to “original energy” or “the truth”.
“Yuu-ki” relates to “brave energy” or “courage”.
“Ki o tsukete” means “attach your energy to what you are doing, or “be careful”.

The origin of ki?

Where does ki originate from? In Aikido the answer is poetic in nature rather than scientific. It is suggested that ki was “born” at the same instant as the rest of the universe, and that we are all born from the ki of the universe. Ki is considered to be an energy that we all have equal access to. It is an energy that courses through our system if we do not restrict it. In Aikido we believe that excess tension physically and emotionally, fear, hate, greed, and anger, all cut us off from the universal source of ki. Our daily practice involves working at maintaining a balanced state physically and emotionally, and indeed, practicing ways to cultivate physical and emotional balance is much of what the study of Aikido is about. In Aikido physical and emotional balance are meant to be two sides of the very same coin. Physical balance helps to engender emotional balance and health, and vice versa as well. Often in my professional work with individuals I find myself first addressing the clients physical balance when they come wanting to resolve emotional issues, and I do the reverse as well. I often first address or explore how emotional imbalance might lead to the physical difficulties they are experiencing.

“Ki signature” mind, spirit-Energy manifests as spirit, spirit manifests as mind

Energy manifests within each individual as spirit, spirit manifests in each individual as mind. In some way that is a mystery to all of mankind, the freely available energy of the universe is transformed by each person into one’s own unique “ki signature”, spirit, mind. No two people have the same exact “ki signature”, just as no two people have the same exact written signature. No two people have the same exact spirit, no two people have the same exact mind. The unique way that we each take in, utilize, and expend energy, can be considered to be our “ki signature”, mind, or spirit. Each person starts with the same source of energy, and manifests this energy in a way that will never exactly be duplicated by any other human being.

Thought, body structure,and movement, shape the flow of ki, into spirit/mind

Think of the freely flowing water of a powerful river that comes upon a series of fairly large rocks spread out across the river bed and extend up beyond the water’s surface. These rocks affect the flow of the river but they do not change the nature of the water itself. Ki flows through the river bed of our brain and body. Our thoughts, body structure and movements, are like the rocks in the river bed. These are the main elements that shape ki into individual mind, or spirit The flow of ki is uniquely transformed by each human being, but the nature of the ki itself, is not altered in the process. Just as the pattern of rocks spread out along the river bed is never exactly duplicated in any other place on earth, the pattern of our thoughts, body structure, and movement is also never exactly duplicated. All mind is similar, but no two minds are exactly alike.

A heartfelt understanding of the nature of our spirit will help us to create a healthy alignment of our thoughts, body structure, movements, and actions. When every aspect of our self is fully aligned we have a much greater ability to think, feel, and act in accordance with what is best for us in any given moment. We are better able to adapt and change in a manner that is supports the well being of our entire self and our surroundings.

The misnomers of “mind-body” and “mind and body”

A definition of “mind” that I often use it in my work, is the following:
“Mind is a dynamic, self-organizing, creative system, capable of overcoming physical and temporal constraints. Mind uses and manufactures energy in order to support the self and one’s surroundings, trade information, and adapt to change.”

When considering this definition of mind, we can say that mind manifests equally in the body and in the brain in the skull. Because of this I believe that the terms “mind-body” or “mind and body” as used in the Western world, are somewhat missing the mark and tend to lead to a certain degree of misunderstanding. If you ask a Japanese person to point to their mind, usually they will point to the area of their heart, or they will point to their lower abdomen. If you ask the average Westerner to point to their mind they will point to their head. This is why I think the terms “mind-body” and “mind and body” were developed in the Western world. I believe that the average Western person thinks of the term “mind” in relation to “thinking” or “thought”. Oriental philosophy considers “mind” to be immanent in both the body and the brain. In Aikido we say that we practice in order to calm the mind, by coordinating our thoughts, the actions of our body, and our breath. Or we say that we practice in order to further empower and actualize our mind by coordinating our thoughts, physical actions, breath, and spirit.

When looking to calm our mind we give our primary attention to calming our breath and our heart beat, which will tend to lead towards a relaxing of our musculature and a slowing down or cessation of our internal dialogue. If we calm our body we will tend to calm our cognitive thought processes. Calming the mind can also be accomplished by giving primary attention to the speed, rhythm, and tone of voice of our internal dialogue. If we calm our cognitive thought processes we will tend to calm the body. When we calm both our cognitive thought processes and our body, then we calm our mind. Cognitive mind and somatic mind are part of a recursive feedback loop. You can’t affect one without affecting the other.

Practice

Would you like to try a Seishindo practice that relates to what you have been reading?
If so please go to the following URL: http://www.seishindo.org/practices/calming_breath.html and try our “Heartbeat Breath – Calming Breath” practice.

About the Author

Charlie Badenhop is the originator of Seishindo, an Aikido instructor, NLP trainer, and Ericksonian Hypnotherapist. Benefit from a new self-help Practice every two weeks, by subscribing to his complimentary newsletter “Pure heart, simple mind” at http://www.seishindo.org/

Perfection

June 8th, 2005

Perfection by Charlie Badenhop

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PERFECTION by Charlie Badenhop
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“Om.
This is perfect.
That is perfect.
From the perfect, comes the perfect.
If from the perfect the perfect is taken away,
Only the perfect remains.
Om, peace, peace, peace.”

This sense of perfection, is the inherent blessing that exists as the essence of everything. This sense of perfection is present at all times and doesn’t require any healing or learning or change to take place. This sense of perfection is dynamic rather than static, and welcomes the necessary ongoing changes of life. This is the kind of perfection that we will be working with and hoping to experience in our time together.

In every day life “perfection” is often thought of as an unachievable “external” ideal, and pursuing this kind of perfection usually leads to ongoing dissatisfaction, as we constantly find something that is not quite “right” that needs to be fixed before everything will be OK. External perfection is static and it can actually be damaging to a supportive concept of self.

Being a perfectionist can be a generative action IF in a healthy Michael Jordan kind of manner we challenge ourselves to achieve ever greater results by having high ideals that are never quite attained, even as we respect and appreciate all that we have already accomplished through our hard work, dedication, and connection to, our unchanging perfection.

In Japanese flower arranging it is common that one of the branches in the arrangement is bent or broken, to signify that the arranger has attempted to present the flowers in a “natural” state. It is the “imperfection” of the broken branch that leads us to understand that the arrangement is potentially “perfect.” We encourage you to look for and appreciate your “broken branches” as a sign of your uniqueness and perfection.

Each one of us, no matter how seemingly evolved we might be, have imperfections and personal ego attachments. These imperfections and attachments are not something to be overcome or transcended, but rather something to be understood, appreciated, and accepted in the course of our life journey. If we do not honor our individual shortcomings, then a part of us will always be feeling that we are somehow “wrong.”

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About the author: Charlie Badenhop, the originator of Seishindo, a licensed instructor of Aikido, a long term practitioner of Self-relations therapy, Ericksonian Hypnosis, and the Japanese healing art of Sei Tai. Has students throughout the world. Contact Charlie at seishin@seishindo.org and subscribe to his free newsletter “Pure heart, simple mind” at http://www.seishindo.org/newsletter.html .

About the Author

About the author: Charlie Badenhop, the originator of
Seishindo, a licensed instructor of Aikido, a long term
practitioner of Self-relations therapy, Ericksonian
Hypnosis, and the Japanese healing art of Sei Tai. Has
students throughout the world. Contact Charlie at
seishin@seishindo.org and subscribe to his free newsletter
“Pure heart, simple mind” at
http://www.seishindo.org/newsletter.html

British Aikido Board Controversy

June 8th, 2005

British Aikido Board Controversy by Henry Ellis

British Aikido Board acronym BAB or
Bad at Budo, this is the governing body for Aikido in the UK, In the UK we have a governing body for each of the martial arts, the governing body should oversee its’s particular art and protect it and it’s members as well as the ancient traditions. There is a universal problem within the martial arts of ” IwannaBeAmaster” brigade of so called teachers who either grade themselves numerous invalid grades and titles, gradmaster being one of the more popular ones along with professor and Shihan to name a few, then we have the ones that concern me the most at the moment is the people who when they think no one is looking, they then re-invent themselves in a vain attempt to gain credibility, I had an immediate beginner in my school “The Ellis Schools of Traditional Aikido” a man called Mr Jack Poole, who has re-inveted his background, and now claims to have started Aikido not in 1968 but in 1952, Aikido was first introduced to the UK by Kenshiro Abbe sensei in 1955, this would make him the first person in the UK to practice Aikido and would of course change the proud history of those that were involved in it’s inception. there is a very controversial article on this issue
on the “British Aikido” web site at
www.GeoCities.com/BritishAikido
The article:
“British Aikido Board Controversy”
This site is a fully documented and honest detailed account of the bizarre conduct and actions of the BAB who instead of protecting it’s heritage actually supported this mans claims and refused all the evidence offered against Mr Poole. The BAB then awarded Mr Poole with a bronze samurai statue to ratify his claims and therefore change the history of British Aikido.
Henry Ellis
Author: “Positive Aikido”.

About the Author

Henry Ellis a direct student of the legendary Martial Artist Kenshiro Abbe sensei from 1956. Author of the book
“Positive Aikido”.